I Disappear When You Log In - Register

 

I Disappear When You Log In - Register

^^ The Advertisements above disappear once you log in. Not a member? Register Now, it's free! ^^
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    be2atc's Avatar
    Senior Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Corinth, Tx
    Posts
    291

    airspace designation

    While comparing our airport to others in the AFD, a question came up. Can anyone tell me why some airports w part time towers are listed as E and some go to G airspace after the tower closes and D services are terminated? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Roddy_Piper's Avatar
    Resident Knucklehead

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Vegas baby
    Posts
    3,339

    Re: airspace designation

    depends on many things, including surrounding airspace, airport, facilities, etc.

    anytime you go to G airspace you really restrict ATC services. when there is a dedicated approach control service near the closing airport, it usually just goes to E airspace so that ATC can provide better services.

    there's many things that affect it.

  3. #3
    StuSEL's Avatar
    Moderator

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    You know where.
    Posts
    642

    Re: airspace designation

    Do you guys have instrument approaches? Are they authorized at night? If "no" to either of those questions, that may be why there is no Class E surrounding the airport when you guys close down the tower.

  4. #4
    be2atc's Avatar
    Senior Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Corinth, Tx
    Posts
    291

    Re: airspace designation

    Good points. The ILS plus a few other nonprecision apps are available after hours. We're located right under a class B shelf. A few of us were thinking closed D equals E, but they show G. There's a few others in region that are E. There's really no observed consistency. We've about concluded it's some useless jackass behind a desk at regional office playing pin the tail on the airspace wo a clue. Which has a high probability of being true.

  5. #5
    WatchThis's Avatar
    Trusted Contributor

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    547

    Re: airspace designation

    For the airports that go G, is there a published E or D surface area (dashed magenta or blue circle)? There are some towers out there that don't have surface areas. These towers would always be G airspace unless there's some sort of temporary notam making it something else, temporarily. In this case, it would alternate from whatever the notam says to G.
    Last edited by WatchThis; 01-11-2012 at 11:39 PM.

  6. #6
    Trusted Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    311

    Re: airspace designation

    It is really pretty random. Two of the class D VFR towers in my airspace revert to class E when closed, the third goes to G. Oddly enough, the one that goes to a G is the one that we could communicate with aircraft on the ground (RCAG is adjacent to the airport) when the tower is closed.

  7. #7
    WatchThis's Avatar
    Trusted Contributor

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    547

    Re: airspace designation

    Found one example:Fort Worth Spinks. KFWS
    This airport is one that has charted Class D but reverts to class G.

    I really don't understand why they'd go to the trouble of getting a D surface area approved and not have it revert to E when the tower is closed. We're only talking 700 verticle feet here since its in a transition area (old term). At first, I thought they may not have automated weather available but they do.

    The only other thing I could guess is when the rule-making process was grinding through, someone, or a group of people, griped that they didn't want the restrictions of a class E when the tower wasn't open. There may also be a statistical reason behind this. In other words, there may have been a determination that the traffic load doesnt warrant the added rules of an E surface area during off hours. You'd have to find the people involved with the creation of the individual D surface areas to get the real answer though.

  8. #8
    be2atc's Avatar
    Senior Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Corinth, Tx
    Posts
    291

    Re: airspace designation

    That's probably the best answer I've heard yet. The IFR loads afterhours in most of these airports is pretty nonexistant. Then again, some that go E are the same. Example CLL.

  9. #9
    BeaconSlash's Avatar
    Senior Member

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    155

    Re: airspace designation

    I've noticed a lot of airports that have Class E surface areas for no apparent reason also used to host an FSS back in the old, old, old days.

    History Home Page

    Kinda makes sense that those airports had what used to be known as "Control Zones."

    Both uncontrolled and controlled airports could be "control zones," in that all that was required was ATC communication ability, and an on-field weather observer.

    I'm sure part of that old ATC communication ability was FSS, as well as on-airport RCAGs.

    Since specs never really die, I think it's distinctly possible that even at airports where towers were eventually built, the reversion airspace stayed what it used to be prior to the tower. I'm sure there are exceptions all over the place, but I think the control zone thing at least explains some of it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •