2013 VRA Eligibility

rooster

Trusted Contributor
Sep 6, 2009
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Anyone ever heard of an ANG controller that never deployed and never had any active duty time (except for training) getting through the application process for a VRA bid?
 

rooster

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Sep 6, 2009
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Having a CTO has nothing to do with getting the 52 weeks of certified experience. As long as a controller earns a rating at home station then they will eventually hit the 52 weeks mark after finishing training.
 

ZEBRA

Senior Member
Sep 24, 2013
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How does the ANG work? Is it just like the reserves with the one weekend a month thing?
 

ZEBRA

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Sep 24, 2013
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The ANG is similar to the Reserves. Please read other threads and don't jump mine.
So sorry to "jump" your thread. Where is my forum etiquette? The reason I was asking is because if you're working one weekend a month I would assume it's going to take quite some time to reach the 52 weeks of experience.
 

rooster

Trusted Contributor
Sep 6, 2009
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So with regards to your original question.... What exactly are you looking for? Are you pissed someone was picked up and you did not?
You hit the nail on the head and hopefully they read this post. Not one but two individuals I know that are not eligible to be hired under a VRA bid have been given TOL's for the 2013 VRA bid. They have never been active duty, never deployed, and have never done anything to be considered a VETERAN. One argued that his title 10 orders for basic training and tech school make him eligible since they hand out GWOTS ribbons to every bright-eyes kid that signed on the dotted line. Not sure how the other one managed to weasel his way in...
 

rooster

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Sep 6, 2009
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So sorry to "jump" your thread. Where is my forum etiquette? The reason I was asking is because if you're working one weekend a month I would assume it's going to take quite some time to reach the 52 weeks of experience.
Since you are able to work at any point in a month your time keeps ticking...
 
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flybyfive

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Jul 23, 2011
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You hit the nail on the head and hopefully they read this post. Not one but two individuals I know that are not eligible to be hired under a VRA bid have been given TOL's for the 2013 VRA bid. They have never been active duty, never deployed, and have never done anything to be considered a VETERAN. One argued that his title 10 orders for basic training and tech school make him eligible since they hand out GWOTS ribbons to every bright-eyes kid that signed on the dotted line. Not sure how the other one managed to weasel his way in...
I'd be so pissed if that were true. That's horse shit to those that have actually gone down range or spent time on active duty. I called HR to verify, time spent in tech school and BCT DO NOT COUNT.
 

ZEBRA

Senior Member
Sep 24, 2013
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Since you are able to work at any point in a month you time keeps ticking...
How much time do you actually work in that month though? I mean, I doubt they're going to call it qualifying experience if you get a 2 hour shift on position once a month. Just my $.02. Who knows.
 

rooster

Trusted Contributor
Sep 6, 2009
715
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How much time do you actually work in that month though? I mean, I doubt they're going to call it qualifying experience if you get a 2 hour shift on position once a month. Just my $.02. Who knows.
Your time qualifies. Depending on the facility and the requirements set forth by management you must maintain proficiency which will be somewhere between 8-10 hours in position.
 

AlphaBravoh

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Feb 17, 2011
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DEFINITION OF “VETERAN”


FEDERAL DEFINITION: under Federal Law a VETERAN is any person, who served honorably on active duty in the armed forces of the United States. (Discharges marked GENERAL AND UNDER HONORABLE CONDITIONS also qualify.)

STANDARD STATE DEFINITION: (Varies by state I believe) To be a "veteran" a person is required to have either: 180 days of regular active duty service and a last discharge or release under honorable conditions Such member does not need to have any wartime service. - OR - 90 days of active duty service, one (1) day of which is during "wartime", and a last discharge or release under honorable conditions. The one-day need not have actually been served in a war zone. For Guard Members to qualify they must have 180 days and have been activated under Title 10 of the U.S. Code.

Which definition would the FAA use? If they use the standard state definition, and the dude that was title 10, if he had at least 180 days then he might qualify.

EDIT: Not condoning ass-hats seeking into the system and taking up spots, especially if they don't deserve it.... I did my time in the service, don't much like it when people say they did shit for their country when they really didn't... but still try to reap the benefits anyway.
 

TEKYLLA

Senior Member
Nov 14, 2008
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DEFINITION OF “VETERAN”


FEDERAL DEFINITION: under Federal Law a VETERAN is any person, who served honorably on active duty in the armed forces of the United States. (Discharges marked GENERAL AND UNDER HONORABLE CONDITIONS also qualify.)

STANDARD STATE DEFINITION: (Varies by state I believe) To be a "veteran" a person is required to have either: 180 days of regular active duty service and a last discharge or release under honorable conditions Such member does not need to have any wartime service. - OR - 90 days of active duty service, one (1) day of which is during "wartime", and a last discharge or release under honorable conditions. The one-day need not have actually been served in a war zone. For Guard Members to qualify they must have 180 days and have been activated under Title 10 of the U.S. Code.

Which definition would the FAA use? If they use the standard state definition, and the dude that was title 10, if he had at least 180 days then he might qualify.

EDIT: Not condoning ass-hats seeking into the system and taking up spots, especially if they don't deserve it.... I did my time in the service, don't much like it when people say they did shit for their country when they really didn't... but still try to reap the benefits anyway.
not all 'veterans' are eligible for VRA...

Veterans' Recruitment Appointment (VRA) (Formerly, Veterans' Readjustment Appointment)

What it provides: VRA allows appointment of eligible veterans up to the GS-11 or equivalent. Veterans are hired under excepted appointments to positions that are otherwise in the competitive service. After the individual satisfactorily completes 2 years of service, the veteran must be converted noncompetitively to a career or career-conditional appointment.
When to use it: VRA can be a good tool for filling entry-level to mid-level positions.
Who is eligible: VRA eligibility applies to the following categories:
Disabled veterans;
Veterans who served on active duty in the Armed Forces during a war declared by Congress, or in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized;
Veterans who, while serving on active duty in the Armed Forces, participated in a military operation for which the Armed Forces Service Medal was awarded; and
Veterans separated from active duty within 3 years.