Age Restrictions for Controllers?

ORDTaffs27

Newcomer
Apr 1, 2017
16
0
1
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
The threads on TOLs got me thinking. I assume because your employer is the FAA that there are age restrictions for controllers, similar to the GAO age restrictions for Federal LE Agents (i.e. mandatory retirement at 57.5 years, therefore no one hired after reaching 37.5 years).

Is there a similar restriction for controllers?
 

MTCTIGUY

Trusted Contributor
Jun 19, 2008
628
1
18
The 'Boro
The threads on TOLs got me thinking. I assume because your employer is the FAA that there are age restrictions for controllers, similar to the GAO age restrictions for Federal LE Agents (i.e. mandatory retirement at 57.5 years, therefore no one hired after reaching 37.5 years).

Is there a similar restriction for controllers?
Must be appointed by 31st Birthday (receive TOL) for folks without a CTO and 52 weeks experience. Prior military with ATC experience may be hired at 35, as well as anyone else not previously in the FAA who holds a CTO and 52 weeks of experience.
 

ORDTaffs27

Newcomer
Apr 1, 2017
16
0
1
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
Must be appointed by 31st Birthday (receive TOL) for folks without a CTO and 52 weeks experience. Prior military with ATC experience may be hired at 35, as well as anyone else not previously in the FAA who holds a CTO and 52 weeks of experience.
Thanks. What's their logic behind the age limit? Is it for mandatory retirement (and a minimum service requirement to that end) or some other reason?
 

MTCTIGUY

Trusted Contributor
Jun 19, 2008
628
1
18
The 'Boro
Thanks. What's their logic behind the age limit? Is it for mandatory retirement (and a minimum service requirement to that end) or some other reason?
Controllers are currently mandated by law to retire at age 56. You need 25 years of service to retire. I imagine that this will be raised to 65 to match the pilots at some point, but it hasn't happened yet.
 

ORDTaffs27

Newcomer
Apr 1, 2017
16
0
1
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
Controllers are currently mandated by law to retire at age 56. You need 25 years of service to retire. I imagine that this will be raised to 65 to match the pilots at some point, but it hasn't happened yet.
As it is with Federal LE agents (in their case, 57.5). I would imagine the argument against it matching the pilot's age is that a controller's job is much more stressful than a pilot, and harder on their physical health. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but it would seem intuitive.
 

NovemberEcho

Epic Member
Dec 8, 2010
4,388
68
48
Long Island
As it is with Federal LE agents (in their case, 57.5). I would imagine the argument against it matching the pilot's age is that a controller's job is much more stressful than a pilot, and harder on their physical health. I'm not sure if that's true or not, but it would seem intuitive.
controller health has little to do with it. Various studies have shown that ability to do the job safely and efficiently drops significantly after the age of 56. It is a public safety rule.
 

wxdude

Senior Member
Jun 5, 2015
172
0
16
51
Controllers are currently mandated by law to retire at age 56. You need 25 years of service to retire. I imagine that this will be raised to 65 to match the pilots at some point, but it hasn't happened yet.
Not 100% correct on needing 25 years to retire for 2152's. In addition to needing 25 years you can retire at the age of 50 or later with 20 years of federal service.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 

MTCTIGUY

Trusted Contributor
Jun 19, 2008
628
1
18
The 'Boro
Not 100% correct on needing 25 years to retire for 2152's. In addition to needing 25 years you can retire at the age of 50 or later with 20 years of federal service.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
Is that the full 50% of salary of highest 3 years retirement or is it something partial?
 

wxdude

Senior Member
Jun 5, 2015
172
0
16
51
Is that the full 50% of salary of highest 3 years retirement or is it something partial?
Not quiet, we are under FERS now. https://www.opm.gov/retirement-services/fers-information/

Only difference for 2152 is that for most controllers will get 1.7% for each year of service up to 20, then 1% there after.

So for 20 years of 2152 with all good time, you would get 34% of I believe your high three. For every year worked past 20 you can add 1% to that amount.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 

MTCTIGUY

Trusted Contributor
Jun 19, 2008
628
1
18
The 'Boro
Not quiet, we are under FERS now. https://www.opm.gov/retirement-services/fers-information/

Only difference for 2152 is that for most controllers will get 1.7% for each year of service up to 20, then 1% there after.

So for 20 years of 2152 with all good time, you would get 34% of I believe your high three. For every year worked past 20 you can add 1% to that amount.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
Good enough for me, although I hear that the president wants to put an end to FERS, so I guess we'll see. I'll defintely be doing some stashing away into the TSP and some additional personal investing. Are they still matching the first 5% of the TSP for folks under FERS?
 

wxdude

Senior Member
Jun 5, 2015
172
0
16
51
Good enough for me, although I hear that the president wants to put an end to FERS, so I guess we'll see. I'll defintely be doing some stashing away into the TSP and some additional personal investing. Are they still matching the first 5% of the TSP for folks under FERS?
You get a base 1% from the FAA without putting a dime into tsp. Your first 3% are matched dollar for dollar. The next 2% are matched by 1/2. So if you contribute 5% you get a matching 5%. If you give 4% you will get a matching 4.5% and so on.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 

FL_CTI

Trusted Member
Oct 8, 2009
468
3
18
Colorado
controller health has little to do with it. Various studies have shown that ability to do the job safely and efficiently drops significantly after the age of 56. It is a public safety rule.
And yet, I can work at a contract tower the day after mandatory retirement doing the exact same job. Not trying to argue, just pointing out the fallacy in the FAA's rule.
 

wxdude

Senior Member
Jun 5, 2015
172
0
16
51
And yet, I can work at a contract tower the day after mandatory retirement doing the exact same job. Not trying to argue, just pointing out the fallacy in the FAA's rule.
You will not find many that want this changed. Controllers as a whole understand why it is there and if NATCA was to go push for its removal that would also mean the removal of early retirement.

That would never fly. Always know the repercussions of what you are going to ask first.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 

ORDTaffs27

Newcomer
Apr 1, 2017
16
0
1
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
So, a question for all. If someone older than 25 (say 35-40) who was independently wealthy, but still wanted to become a controller for "love of the job..." (yeah, I know, I know... :D ), would they still be refused because they'd not be able to put in "20 years," etc. before "mandatory retirement?"

Point being, it just seems unfair to deny anyone the opportunity to do the job for which they might still be qualified and physically capable, save only for the fact that they're "older than the max. age to hire" and would not complete a full 20 years before mandatory retirement." I have the same gripe with Federal LE agencies and the GAO requirement to retire at 57.5 years (meaning the max. age to hire is 37.5 years). I can understand a "max age to hire" that is tied to the actuarial analysis of how long it takes the agency to get full ROI on the investment into that employee. For example, if mandatory retirement is at 55, and the agency concludes that it takes 5 years after all training and probationary periods (i.e "journeyman" status) for the agency to reap 100% ROI on the investment in that individual, then the "max. age to hire" should be somewhere around age 50 (slightly less to cover training and probationary time). If that means the employee signs on, knowing they would not get the full benefit of retirement pay (pension, etc.) because they haven't put in a full 20 years, then that's their choice.

And don't worry.... I'm over the mandatory retirement age, anyway... :D
 

ajmezz

Epic Member
Apr 8, 2010
1,811
28
48
My question is why would someone with a love for the job wait until they were 35-40 to pursue said job?
 

wxdude

Senior Member
Jun 5, 2015
172
0
16
51
If they love it so much, buy a CTO then work contract.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
 

ORDTaffs27

Newcomer
Apr 1, 2017
16
0
1
Tampa Bay Area, Florida
My question is why would someone with a love for the job wait until they were 35-40 to pursue said job?
Perhaps they were not aware of this "love for the job" until they reached that age... perhaps they had other commitments before then... there could be a number of different reasons. But, apparently, it doesn't matter as they'd be denied anyway...