Comparison of BQ Answers

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SirMario

Senior Analyst
Apr 15, 2010
809
15
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actually it's a widely known scientifically studied phenomenon. confirmed, peer reviewed...etc.

there's lots of things that can change how you answer self assessment tests. how much sleep you've had, caffeine intake, if you take it in the morning or at night.

we're not as static as you (or the FAA) think.

that's why most personality tests are 140+ questions long and they repeat questions in a variety of ways. it's in part because it reduces the effect one question answered differently would have on your overall score and normalizes the whole thing to try to find your real personality traits.

which goes right back to the point of 60 questions being completely invalid (and significantly RNO/Gender biased as well)
Maybe, but that applies to a 140+ questionnaire...not this garbage...regardless of what i would still answer them the same lol...since its actually very little, besides lot of the actual questions can be validated by your history...maybe 10-15 if i remember actually ask how you would react in this or that situation...Besides, maybe you didn't get it not on one or two particular questions, maybe each question carried a certain point and maybe you just did not make it because your HS grades were not all that.. :p

PS i do find my self a very static individual, especially when it comes to emotions, stress and dealing with stressful scenarios..
 

ar15is223

Newcomer
Feb 28, 2014
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+1 Let me put this Engineering degree to work, if not for the FAA then why not to try and find out if it is better to play with a rock or a calendar!!!
 

AMUNOZ14

Newcomer
Feb 6, 2014
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GREAT JOB with this and we all appreciate you taking the time to do collect and analyze some data.
 

jwatzman

Newcomer
Feb 28, 2014
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Awesome collection of data! It would be enormously helpful to have a second posting that includes only the answers of those who got a green check mark!
 

Ram_Tough

Trusted Contributor
Jul 5, 2010
638
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Wow, no wonder so many people didn't make it past the BQ, you all chose the same answers. Just looking at this leads me to belive that a lot of you checked what you thought they wanted to hear, not what you really are. Next time just answer truthfully.
 

Jax

Senior Analyst
Nov 17, 2010
869
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N90-EWR
Wow, no wonder so many people didn't make it past the BQ, you all chose the same answers. Just looking at this leads me to belive that a lot of you checked what you thought they wanted to hear, not what you really are. Next time just answer truthfully.
I don't think it really mattered. One of my fellow controllers in the area has a nephew and a son that applied, they filled out everything exactly the same, with only the names being different, and one passed, the other didn't.
 

Ram_Tough

Trusted Contributor
Jul 5, 2010
638
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Hmmm, maybe this is some sort of control group and they took a small number of people from each profile they had and will make future decisions based off what they learn over the next few months/years.
 

Special_K

Senior Member
Jun 16, 2008
210
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I don't think it really mattered. One of my fellow controllers in the area has a nephew and a son that applied, they filled out everything exactly the same, with only the names being different, and one passed, the other didn't.
I hope this doesn't come across as me calling your coworker or his nephew and son a liar, but I'm suspicious about these claims that x number of people got together and answered this questionnaire the same way.

A.) Beforehand, who would've thought that the questionnaire would eliminate so many people. Therefore, how many people would have thought to get together and answer the questionnaire exactly the same way to have an argument afterward. Did people get together to complete the questionnaire simultaneously, and maybe even discuss or agree on certain answers to some questions? Most likely yes. Did people get together and answer every question exactly the same way? I am highly skeptical of that.

B.) The questionnaire contained something like 60 questions with five possible responses each, right? Using this example, that means there are 5^60 possible ways to answer the questionnaire (sometimes it helps to see the raw number: 867,361,737,988,404,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000). The random likelihood that just two people would answer the questionnaire exactly the same is astronomical. That several people (I think one post on here mentioned four) would answer the questionnaire the same, fugget about it. If exactly the same answers to the questionnaire were turned in, I'm sure the computer's WTF alarm would go off. What happens then, I don't know.

While I remain skeptical, I apologize in advance if I am wrong and some applicants did turn in the exact same questionnaire.
 

aprout88

Newcomer
Sep 20, 2012
23
0
1
Colorado
B.) The questionnaire contained something like 60 questions with five possible responses each, right? Using this example, that means there are 5^60 possible ways to answer the questionnaire (sometimes it helps to see the raw number: 867,361,737,988,404,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000). The random likelihood that just two people would answer the questionnaire exactly the same is astronomical. That several people (I think one post on here mentioned four) would answer the questionnaire the same, fugget about it. If exactly the same answers to the questionnaire were turned in, I'm sure the computer's WTF alarm would go off. What happens then, I don't know.

While I remain skeptical, I apologize in advance if I am wrong and some applicants did turn in the exact same questionnaire.
This would mean there is an equally likely chance of any answer being chosen. Clearly that is not the case since some questions show for example (200 answered b and 0 answered d). Not that i disagree with your premise but the possibility of it happening are not quite so astronomical.
 
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