Enroute Map and Non-Radar Problems

deltabravo89

Senior Analyst
Mar 11, 2010
1,011
0
36
Stripmarking is lame they don't even use that in the real world. From what I've heard from my source the map is the most important piece of information because everything builds off of that.
Well, "OTS pro" you are incorrect. Strip marking is most definitely used in the real world. Let alone in the academy, where you have to PASS before you get to the "real world." what, are you going to argue that to an FAA evaluator? Haha they will just look at you with the stupid look I had on my face when I read your post. Yea, the map is important. But the point I'm getting at, is that it's EASY. Other stuff you use the map for is what is hard about it. Stripmarking isn't used in the real world. Haha funniest shit ever. Yea, remember that time I didn't write on the strip because I thought it was lame and cleared a guy off the same airport that someone was on approach to? It was so lame.
 

rogersjf

Trusted Contributor
Mar 11, 2009
656
9
18
New Jersey
You can find a mix of many different maps here on stuck mic, the current map that is used at ZAE is the one the states "For course number 50148 purposes only 1/14/11" in the upper left hand corner. Likewise under the current eram sech. you have a total of 7 hrs class time for map study and it is more then enough. You need to know the radials for the map test but during non radar you just need to know the victor ways and the direction from the vortec or vordme. This is for DME reporting, TCP, restrictions the list goes on and on. My suggestion for people coming here in the near future would to take a break and forget air traffic until you get here. The map test is only worth 2% of your total grade, if you were to study something I would suggest studying Acrft. char. that is worth 7% of your total grade which is the equivalent to one non radar problem, easy points.
 

SCOPED

Senior Analyst
Nov 21, 2010
1,013
0
36
Gods Country, Alaska
The ACT is only worth 4% of your grade for enroute and it is very simple. I get wanting to try and get a jump on stuff but it's not realistic. Working knowledge of your map is the hardest part about the map and that only comes from running problems. They are very picky about stripmarking but that will come running problems also.
 

Rosstafari

Daaaang.
Aug 17, 2008
1,149
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Stripmarking is lame they don't even use that in the real world. From what I've heard from my source the map is the most important piece of information because everything builds off of that.
"From your source"? You've got two or three people who just went through the Academy explaining what they've found to be important. Unless your "source" is an instructor there, you're not going to get much better, more timely advice.

Yes, you need to know the map, but they're really not lying to you when they say you have more than enough time to memorize it. Our entire class had it down within four days. Would've been two, except a couple guys dragged their feet. They're not trying to trick you in OKC -- take the word of the people who were just there. You're equipped to succeed.

And you absolutely need to know how to stripmark in the "real world". There's still non-radar out there, and it's what will be fallen back on if radars go down. You won't get through D-school without knowing how to stripmark, either.
 

retiredatcguy

Newcomer
Jan 11, 2012
1
0
1
Being able to draw the map is not the same as being able to use the map. Knowing "what" you will need to know from the map is critical.

If you can get a copy of the aero center JAN LO map then just pratice drawing it onto a blank sheet of paper. You can trace the sector and appraoch boundries and mark the position of the VORTAC's before you begin. Everything else you need to draw from memory

Everything on the map is important but some of the information is used more frequently when running non-radar problems. As an example, every aircraft will require a frequency change. There are small diamonds on every airway at the boundry to the JAN low sector and the approach control boundries. You must know these diamond mileages very well. Additionally you must know all the frequencies, both VHF and UHF, without looking at the map. Next you must know all the intersections. When you can "see" in your mind V18, V427, V74, V245, V535, V11, V417, V555, V557, V9 then you are getting it.

Can you visualize an aircraft that is going from MIZZE to JAN to HATER? How about:
UJM SQS IGB
HLI SQS GLH
ZAMMA JAN DORTS
GLH JAN MEI
VKS HEZ
0M8 JAN MCB
What would be the airways each of these aircraft are on?

What would be the correct frequency and diamond mileage for the comm change?

Additionally, if you have not read the 7110.65 from cover to cover you need to do so (SEVERAL TIMES). If you are in the enroute option then you can ignore anything that says TERMINAL in the 7110.65. You can also skip the chapters on OCEANIC. It will not aply to you at the academy. Chapter 1 and 2 are very useful as well as chapter 6 non-radar. Read the GLOSSARY several times. ATC is like learning a foreign language. Even if you are a pilot the GLOSSARY will teach you a lot.

Download a copy of the AIM in PDF format and read it. The AIM is written for pilots and includes instructions on how to respond to ATC instructions. It tells pilots what to expect from ATC. If you are going to be the one issuing the instructions you need to know what the pilots expect to hear and what they are expected to do with those instructions.
Study METAR. Learn the abbreviations and the correct format for reading a METAR report.

Learning non-radar at the academy is not something you can expect to do on-your-own before you even get there. It is a real "hands-on" type of learning experience. But reading the 7110.65 and the AIM is well worth your time.

Finally, do yourself a big favor, do not bring a lot of distractions with you when you come to OKC. If you can, leave your personal problems, demands, distractions, pets, kids, family, trouble and bad habits back home.
 

mjaycee1

Newcomer
Oct 12, 2009
10
0
1
Found this study seminar for the ZAE Map when I googled it...
ZAE Study Seminar (google it for yourself to get pics and lesson plans, etc...

  1. FAQ - ZAE Study Seminar

    www.[B]zae[/B]study.com/#!faq
    This is a map of the airspace above central Mississippi and surrounding areas. ... ZAE or Aero Center is a fictional ARTCC that is used for training purposes at ...



  2. [DOC] Welcome to Lesson Two! Welcome to lesson two! Thanks again for ...

    media.wix.com/.../510cf1_dd1c925cc7ae2ec9b77907d5a7ce60fb.do...
    File Format: Microsoft Word - Quick View
    This week we will continue to familiarize ourselves with the national airspace ... Luckily this one is easy as it has only two radials displayed on the ZAE map.



  3. [DOC] ZAE Study Seminar

    media.wix.com/.../510cf1_e28b22f35a8c5db32f83f85b3fae835a.do...
    File Format: Microsoft Word - Quick View
    We will also be familiarizing ourselves with the different aspects of the National Airspace System that are depicted on the Aero Center map. Your Introduction to ...
 

nicholelm

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2011
186
0
16
VERY happy to hear that we can leave the Terminal Nonradar sections out. I know that Enroute controls some aircraft into unmanned or closed airports and it was kickin my ass.
 

disorder

Newcomer
Jan 9, 2012
7
0
1
Silly question, but what are all these rules to the right of the zae map posted earlier in the thread here?

I've never heard of these, but then again why would i have?
44k rule, 22k rule, etc.? Is there somewhere these things are explained?
 

makemywords

Rookie
Nov 30, 2011
56
0
6
Silly question, but what are all these rules to the right of the zae map posted earlier in the thread here?

I've never heard of these, but then again why would i have?
44k rule, 22k rule, etc.? Is there somewhere these things are explained?
It looks like it's lateral or longitudinal separation requirements. Check Ch. 6, Section 4 & 5 of the .65.

"D" and "E" looks like departing aircraft (D) or en-route (E) & "K" is knots.
 

JosueZQ8

Senior Analyst
Feb 18, 2009
836
3
18
Amherst, OH
We used all those rules at CCBC, but that was over 3.5 years ago, so I don't recall much of it. lol

Waiting for the lesson plans this week to go over all of that.
 

productfly

Senior Member
Apr 24, 2010
240
1
18
ZNY Till I Die!!!
The 44kt rule and the 22kt rule is a form of longitudinal seperation
44kt rule would get 3min or 5 miles seperation.
22kt rule would get 5min or 10 miles seperation.

The rules can be used for example in enroute non radar when you have 2 departures leaving the same airport requesting the same proposed dept. time, route, altitude and destination. You would look at the difference in speed between the planes.if the difference in speed is between 22kt and 43kt your seperation would be 5min. If the difference in speed is 44kt or more your seperation would be 3min. (Remember your speed limit under 10,000ft is 250kt). This rule only works if the faster plane departs first. So you would depart the slower plane (if using the 44kt rule) 3 min after the faster plane departs.
Im not going to go into the phraseology or stripmarking.
I honestly wouldnt worry about this one till you get too the academy, theyll teach you exactly how to apply it. You hardly ever use this rule but still very good to know.
 
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deltabravo89

Senior Analyst
Mar 11, 2010
1,011
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The 44kt rule and the 22kt rule is a form of longitudinal seperation.
44kt rule would get 3min or 5 miles seperation.
22kt rule would get 5min or 10 miles seperation.

The rules can be used for example when you have 2 departures leaving the same airport requesting the same proposed dept. time, route and destination. You would look at the difference in speed between the planes.if the difference in speed is between 22kt and 43kt your seperation would be 5min. If the difference in speed is between 44kt or more your seperation would be 3min. (Remember your speed limit under 10,000ft is 250kt). This rule only works if the faster plane departs first. So you would depart the slower plane (if using the 44kt rule) 3 min after the faster plane departs.
Im not going to go into the phraseology or stripmarking.
I honestly wouldnt worry about this one till you get too the academy, theyll teach you exactly how to apply it. You hardly ever use this rule but still very good to know.
Dont know what .65 you read but those rules are for same, converging or crossing courses. And can be used between one airport, and an adjacent airport. Phraseology is simple. Cross ... At or before/after (time)
 

productfly

Senior Member
Apr 24, 2010
240
1
18
ZNY Till I Die!!!
For my example you would coordinate with the next sector " blah blah blah.... Using the 44kt rule in trail of n1234"

Then issue the clearence "....blah blah blah n1235 released 3min < n1234 departs."
 

cbasssss

Newcomer
Mar 17, 2013
19
0
1
Anybody have the current map we need to learn for the academy? headed to okc next month! would really appreciate it
 

cbasssss

Newcomer
Mar 17, 2013
19
0
1
And also by when do you have to memorize the map? im headed to AT basics first then enroute basics... its probably for the start of enroute basics right?
 

flik221

Junior Member
Mar 20, 2014
75
1
8
Although I am not 100% sure, I am pretty certain that they still use the map that is linked to on the first page of this thread. Correct me if I am wrong though.
 

RVG86

Junior Member
Mar 19, 2012
132
3
18
Don't stress about the map until you get to the academy. They give you like 2 hours a day while you're in class to study it. Everyone in my class had it down in like 3 days.

Worry more about putting lines through the middle of your Z's. Or focus on getting in the habit of saying "niner" and "tree".