Heres the list.

TerminallyIll

Rookie
Mar 1, 2013
60
0
6

TowerView

Newcomer
Jun 17, 2008
22
0
1
Florida
For those of you in closing towers, check with your airport manager. Perhaps there may be the opportunity to set up an airport UNICOM. God knows its not ATC, but it might be something to hold you over.
 

GUYONABUFFALO

Epic Member
Oct 4, 2012
1,284
24
38
Minnesota
Im sure there is a thread for this, but can the contract guys get hired directly by the FAA directly now or what can those poor folks do?
 

wxman

Rookie
Jun 16, 2008
49
0
6
Congrats to the the 24 towers that were taken off the list. Unfortunately the tower I work at remains on it......here we go.........
 

GeorgeM

Trusted Member
Jun 18, 2008
393
0
16
CO
I'm sure there is a thread for this, but can the contract guys get hired directly by the FAA directly now or what can those poor folks do?
No, there's a hiring freeze, to save money.
 

GUYONABUFFALO

Epic Member
Oct 4, 2012
1,284
24
38
Minnesota
No, there's a hiring freeze, to save money.

I am aware of that ( I have a TOL), but thanks anyway! Will they be able to move ahead of us in the hiring process? I am number one for my facility in line for OAK but the first one to say they sure as hell should be ahead of us. I hope they get placed soon! ... where the cluster f$#% will really be is when those towers open again and the controllers trained in are gone. It will end up costing the FAA more in the long run than the 3% they are complaining about right now.
 

wxman

Rookie
Jun 16, 2008
49
0
6
Out of the 24 tower that were saved.....10 have less than 50,000 ops a year (IAG has the lowest 26,000 ops a year followed by STJ 27,000 ops a year) 6 towers out of the 24 have ops ranging from 100,000 to 127,000..........all the rest fall between 50,000 and 80,000 ops a year.......
 

unable

Trusted Member
Jan 31, 2013
399
36
28
Over the Rainbow
National Air Traffic Controllers Association President Paul Rinaldi issued the following statement regarding the announcement by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to close air traffic control towers around the country as part of sequester-caused budget cutting:

“The closure of these air traffic control towers will reduce the overall margin of safety of our entire aviation system. Ultimately, the partisan posturing in Washington that led to sequestration is the reason for today’s decision and its destructive effects on aviation. The FAA made a bad situation worse by not utilizing a well-thought-out process for evaluating the value of air traffic control towers before ordering their closure. Even if there was a good way to do this, the mandated budget cuts under sequestration have forced the FAA to prioritize its decision based on expediency rather than safety and efficiency.

“Today’s decision will have both short-term and long-term effects. These towers serve other important functions – including law enforcement activity, medical transport flights, search and rescue missions, business and commerce and supporting flight schools across America. Future aviators depend on these airports and tower services to continue their training. Every pilot starts in a small plane, including those who eventually fly commercial or military aircraft. If these schools shut down, an important pipeline of future aviators may be shut down too.

“NATCA has been warning for months that if sequestration went into effect, there could be furloughs and tower closures. We take no pleasure in being proven right. But we will not stop informing the public and the Congress how imperative it is that sequestration be replaced. Our national aviation system is a vital economic engine; it supports 10 million jobs and $1.3 trillion in economic activity. If you diminish the system, you diminish the economy. It's that simple.

“We will keep fighting to replace the sequester because it is bad for aviation and bad for our economy. The American people should understand that the effects of this will be felt for some time to come. There will be a slow degradation of capacity and efficiency at a time when we should be focused on increasing both.”
 

be2atc

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2011
295
1
18
Corinth, Tx
A few on the list are being picked up financially by the local cities. No change at all and no interruption of service. Instead of the FAA paying the contractors the city does. Not enough, but some.
 

JoshATC

Epic Member
Jun 27, 2010
1,384
7
38
ZLA CPC
Out of the 24 tower that were saved.....10 have less than 50,000 ops a year (IAG has the lowest 26,000 ops a year followed by STJ 27,000 ops a year) 6 towers out of the 24 have ops ranging from 100,000 to 127,000..........all the rest fall between 50,000 and 80,000 ops a year.......
Our Facility is the Busiest on that list. We did 149K lol but I think our City is going to pick us up.. who knows tho nothing if 100%
 

TerminallyIll

Rookie
Mar 1, 2013
60
0
6
A few on the list are being picked up financially by the local cities. No change at all and no interruption of service. Instead of the FAA paying the contractors the city does. Not enough, but some.
I'm assuming you are referring to the 16 cost share towers? At my facility the local government pays 60% of our contract and FAA kicks in 40%. Apparently, there is some level of congressional legislation that had previously set aside funding for the cost share towers. We do 30,000 ops per annum, if not for cost share we would be closed. My hunch is we will survive until end of 2015 when the contracts expire.

It is bittersweet. I feel awful that so many of you are affected by this ridiculous cut. It makes no sense. On a selfish note i'm a happy guy.

Good luck to you all!!