IFR Aircraft Through a MOA in Class G Airspace

briN

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Oct 21, 2009
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I've seen this before but never done it so I'm curious.

The 7110.65 says nothing, that i can see, approving an IFR aircraft through a MOA even in Class G airspace.

Has anyone ever done this? What are the procedures? I would imagine the pilot would specifically have to request it and since it's uncontrolled i suppose you couldnt say no? Would you clear him through the MOA?
 

NovemberEcho

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Dec 8, 2010
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No, it does not depend on the MOA. Non-participating IFR aircraft are prohibited from flying through active MOA’s regardless of the class airspace. The whole purpose of MOA’s is to separate non-participating IFR traffic from those using the MOA.
 
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briN

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FAA JO 7400.2M (28 Feb 2019)

25−1−8. MOAs IN CLASS G AIRSPACE MOAs may be designated in Class G airspace. Using agencies and pilots operating in such MOAs should be aware that nonparticipating aircraft may legally operate IFR or VFR without an ATC clearance in these MOAs. Pilots of nonparticipating aircraft may operate VFR in Class G airspace in conditions as low as 1 statute mile flight visibility and clear of clouds (see Section 91.155 for complete Class G airspace VFR minima). Any special procedures regarding operations within MOAs that encompass Class G airspace should be included in a letter of agreement between the controlling and using agencies.


I know Salt Lake Center use to take an IFR guy through a MOA on a regular basis (one specific pilot since he was so familiar with the area)
 

Stinger

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May 24, 2009
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Should be a total non-issue these days. The amount of Class G airspace left above 1200AGL is extremely small.
 

NovemberEcho

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FAA JO 7400.2M (28 Feb 2019)

25−1−8. MOAs IN CLASS G AIRSPACE MOAs may be designated in Class G airspace. Using agencies and pilots operating in such MOAs should be aware that nonparticipating aircraft may legally operate IFR or VFR without an ATC clearance in these MOAs. Pilots of nonparticipating aircraft may operate VFR in Class G airspace in conditions as low as 1 statute mile flight visibility and clear of clouds (see Section 91.155 for complete Class G airspace VFR minima). Any special procedures regarding operations within MOAs that encompass Class G airspace should be included in a letter of agreement between the controlling and using agencies.


I know Salt Lake Center use to take an IFR guy through a MOA on a regular basis (one specific pilot since he was so familiar with the area)
Well shit.
 

briN

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I posted this a few months back ... some old guy refused to believe since it wasn't in the .65... i told him its still an FAA reg... didnt get anywhere he said if they could it be in the .65. Waste of time.

We have a MOA in class G here but the surrounding airspace makes it unnecessary so it wouldnt be used
 

planetalkerkp

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Jun 15, 2008
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No, it does not depend on the MOA. Non-participating IFR aircraft are prohibited from flying through active MOA’s regardless of the class airspace. The whole purpose of MOA’s is to separate non-participating IFR traffic from those using the MOA.
You're thinking of a Restricted Area.
 

planetalkerkp

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Jun 15, 2008
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No, it does not depend on the MOA. Non-participating IFR aircraft are prohibited from flying through active MOA’s regardless of the class airspace. The whole purpose of MOA’s is to separate non-participating IFR traffic from those using the MOA.
Well, this is almost the text book definition of Restricted Area. If you inserted "Restricted Area" for "MOA", in the quote above, it would be a true statement.