New Guy, Enroute, No Atc Experience

Anthony1776

New member
Dec 3, 2015
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Long Island, New York
Hello all,

Got my clearances back and waiting for HR to call me with a "class date". Medical office said new one on the calendar for me would be Dec 30th. That's close! I'm enroute. NO prior ATC experience. 25 year old professional in the solar industry. Not go boast but I did graduate college years ago with high honors; I'm no smarty pants but no dummy either.

What should I start to study? And what kind of work load should I expect seeing as I'm enroute. I hear enroute is slightly more difficult than terminal.

YES... I have the GREEN BOOK. That's how I passed the AT-SAT exam. :)

This forum seems like a great one.

Thank you all in advance!
 

ajmezz

Well-known member
Apr 8, 2010
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This forum is toxic if you get offended easily. The academy is setup to teach you everything from zero experience, so realistically you shouldn't need to study anything. Maybe look up air traffic basics and see what you can find, but other than that just enjoy your free time before going to the academy. Once you get there expect to be bombarded with new information daily/weekly and apply it later on. Good luck!
 

BeaconSlash

New member
Aug 19, 2011
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Don't worry about studying now. Literally everything you need to pass OKC will be spoon fed to you in an extremely structured way. Whether you can apply what you're taught is where the rubber meets the road, and you can't study for that part.

Difficulty is in the mind of the beholder. Some people who can't hack En Route do fine in Terminal, and vice versa. Some people can do both well, some people can't do either safely at all. You won't know until you try.

I don't know what the Green Book is to you, but to controllers, it's the NATCA/FAA CBA before the White Book. Don't let that confuse you.
 

ajmezz

Well-known member
Apr 8, 2010
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To add on to what Beacon said, this job isn't for everyone. There is no shame in failing as long you gave it your all while in training. It really boils down to whether you can do it or you can't.
 

ATC_VOL

New member
Jan 20, 2010
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About the only thing worth studying is the academy map if you can find a copy somewhere. Since you have no experience, knowing basic aircraft characteristics can be helpful (i.e. difference in a citation vs a king air vs a 172. But even that's not entirely important.

They literally do teach you everything you need to know. It will be a lot of info but with hard work and some quick thinking on eval days you'll be fine.

Best way I've heard the academy described is that it's a game that resembles Air Traffic. If you can prove you can play this game then you'll be given a shot to try the real thing eventually.
 

BeaconSlash

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Aug 19, 2011
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Wouldn't even worry about the map. I stressed over it for so long for nothing...

And beside, even if you have it down cold before you walk in to OKC, like, can draw it perfectly every time... you still wont REALLY know your map until you use it in scenarios.
 

Genot

New member
Feb 7, 2010
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A Dark Dark Room
The green book BeaconSlash talks about is different than the ASA published book you're referring to. I think a super basic version of the academy airspace map is in there. Start there. Like everyone says, you'll be spoon fed everything. However if you have time to spare knowing Cessna 100/200 series are (except the C400) single engines, 300 through 400 series are twins and 500-700 are jets and similar helps a little. Similarly a Beechcraft BE 30 is a hell of a lot faster than a BE35, which makes sense if you know what either is.
 

Isenthalpic

New member
Apr 15, 2015
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It's harder, and it has a high failure rate because people don't take it seriously. There are classes where almost everyone passes, and there are classes where almost everyone fails. There is a high correlation between classes that form study groups and help each other out to classes with high pass rates. Of course when more people pass, you have more facilities to choose from, so people should help each other out. Those that don't pass are the ones not studying every day. A couple months of studying for a job tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, and maybe even millions of Americans would be jealous of? Just ****ing study for a couple of months while you're there instead of binging on Netflix or partying.
 

ATC_VOL

New member
Jan 20, 2010
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I'll have to dive right in then...

I'm also hearing that Enroute is more difficult AND more 'mental math' based than terminal, correct? I hear 50% failure rate for Enroute.
I think the math aspect gets blown out of proportion a bit. Basic subtraction/addition during non-radar will get you the mileage you need for restrictions. And about the only math you do while working radar is figuring out a climb rate, which is just basic multiplication. Long story short, I'm a guy from east TN who counts using his fingers and never had any issue with the math.

Each class is different in terms of failure rate. While I was at OKC the 4 or 5 classes ahead of me all had 50% or greater wash out rates, including the group who evaled 2 days before us. Then my class did great, had several people get 100's and 95's, and only had 1 person wash out. Don't worry about what everyone else is doing outside your class. Just focus on you and being a good remote pilot for your classmates.
 

Anthony1776

New member
Dec 3, 2015
4
0
0
Long Island, New York
It's harder, and it has a high failure rate because people don't take it seriously. There are classes where almost everyone passes, and there are classes where almost everyone fails. There is a high correlation between classes that form study groups and help each other out to classes with high pass rates. Of course when more people pass, you have more facilities to choose from, so people should help each other out. Those that don't pass are the ones not studying every day. A couple months of studying for a job tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, and maybe even millions of Americans would be jealous of? Just ****ing study for a couple of months while you're there instead of binging on Netflix or partying.
Thank you for the response. I still cant wrap my head around people not taking this seriously... I intend to study almost, if not every single day. This is it, the pinnacle, the peak, the big life test, the job/career that will set you for life. I was a serious student and will be taking this OKC serious as well :) And disclaimer, I dont drink, lol.
 

Anthony1776

New member
Dec 3, 2015
4
0
0
Long Island, New York
I think the math aspect gets blown out of proportion a bit. Basic subtraction/addition during non-radar will get you the mileage you need for restrictions. And about the only math you do while working radar is figuring out a climb rate, which is just basic multiplication. Long story short, I'm a guy from east TN who counts using his fingers and never had any issue with the math.

Each class is different in terms of failure rate. While I was at OKC the 4 or 5 classes ahead of me all had 50% or greater wash out rates, including the group who evaled 2 days before us. Then my class did great, had several people get 100's and 95's, and only had 1 person wash out. Don't worry about what everyone else is doing outside your class. Just focus on you and being a good remote pilot for your classmates.
Again, thank you for the response. I'm glad to hear you think this about Enroute Math. Math does not come to me like talking and walking; working at it hard is what got me my college honors in economics/finance. Seeing as your a 'fingers' kinda guy makes me worry less haha. I love your honesty, thank you.
 

HenryTheAce

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Jul 21, 2014
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ZMP -> D21
Having just passed evals there in Late September. The thing that I thought was the most helpful was knowing LOAs and SOPs. Anyone can memorize a map after drawing it 1000 times. But being able to understand and especially understand SOPs and LOAs is big there. Like everyone's saying just enjoy you're time now. They'll give you plenty of time to study and give you everything you need
 

StuSEL

Moderator
Aug 23, 2009
1,016
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You know where.
SOP = Standard Operating Procedures

LOA = Letter of Agreement (ie. What you are required to do with airplanes that are en-route to other sectors.)