Please Leave a Review for a CTI School

Studmuhfin

Rookie
Feb 12, 2015
47
0
6
Atlanta
Until the tract record proves otherwise, Beaver County will continue to be the top CTI school. Can't argue with the results. Its the school with the highest rate of success in checking out here at N90.
i didn't go to beaver, but some of my class mates did. If you get the terminal option, I'd say beaver is the best school. As for if you get enroute, beaver gives you zero training in the enroute environment. Realistically, no school can adequately prepare you for enroute at the academy though.
 

BrianC28

Rookie
Feb 9, 2016
36
0
6
OTS and got a FOL that many CTI school grads dream of... What is the point of wasting money at these schools???
 

BrianC28

Rookie
Feb 9, 2016
36
0
6
^ and before the butt hurt happens... real question. Why do People enroll in these when they are hiring off the street and OTS students are having a lot of success?!?!
 

MikeKiloRomeo

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2016
205
6
18
Planning on going to Beaver County Community College it seems to have a good rep has anyyone already been there if so what did you think?
Beaver is great - I've made lifelong friends there. But there's no point to wasting your time at a CTI school anymore when preference isn't given - especially paying out-of-state tuition.
Get the green book and you'll be fine.
 

Purplelobj

Epic Member
Jan 29, 2014
1,646
19
38
There is a bill in the Senate right now that changes hiring bs k similar to what it was. CTI has their own path , Military has their own path, and then everyone can also apply OTS. So CTI may not be dead yet.
 

kaeXo

Senior Member
Feb 5, 2016
265
2
18
There is a bill in the Senate right now that changes hiring bs k similar to what it was. CTI has their own path , Military has their own path, and then everyone can also apply OTS. So CTI may not be dead yet.
This is true but there're thousands upon thousands of current CTI graduates waiting to get picked up. Actually getting hired from this pool once changed will take a long time unless you're lucky.
 

Purplelobj

Epic Member
Jan 29, 2014
1,646
19
38
This is true but there're thousands upon thousands of current CTI graduates waiting to get picked up. Actually getting hired from this pool once changed will take a long time unless you're lucky.
There are few CTI applicants than OTS applicants... and you could apply to two announcements, the CTI (and VRA) announcements would not include the biographical questionnaire. Either way it will take luck.
 

customcables067

Senior Member
Sep 1, 2010
199
1
18
Of these "thousands upon thousands" of CTI grads, I think many of them (I know several) are giving up on the ATC gig and going other directions. I know many went the commercial pilot route, and are now starting at mainline carriers. They've established families, bought houses, etc. A fair share of them may not WANT the ATC gig anymore, despite being a "CTI grad without a ATC job." No disagreement that it will take luck, but I think a lot of CTIs that were rejected this last round (or didn't make a panel before the hiring changes) may be looking to backup plans as well.

2cents.
 

altonb2

Senior Member
Jan 23, 2014
253
0
16
Pensacola, Fl
There is a bill in the Senate right now that changes hiring bs k similar to what it was. CTI has their own path , Military has their own path, and then everyone can also apply OTS. So CTI may not be dead yet.
I thought the House told the Senate to take the bill and shove it...
 

Purplelobj

Epic Member
Jan 29, 2014
1,646
19
38
Not that this is the right thread for this, but this is the update that was sent out this week:

Latest on FAA Reauthorization


Dear Brothers and Sisters,

The U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on FAA Reauthorization legislation late this afternoon, however that vote could potentially spill over into tomorrow. We appreciate the work the Senate has done on this bill in a relatively short timeframe. As you know, authorizing legislation can be very complicated and involves a lot of stakeholders. In the past, Congress has passed extensions rather than move forward on the difficult task of reauthorizing the FAA.

The Senate bill does not reform the structure of the FAA nor its status as a government agency. Stable, predictable, and sustainable funding remains a top priority for us in any long-term FAA bill. However, the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee did not have the ability to solve the funding issue, which is why it is not in the bill. Although we have concerns that an 18-month reauthorization is not long enough, we see this vote as a positive step toward ensuring predictability for the FAA.

The bill contains some positives and negatives for our members. We have been working closely with the full Committee and the Aviation Subcommittee members and their staffs as well as other members of the Senate and their staffs. We thank them for their efforts on the underlying bill as well as amendments.

We support new controller hiring language that is contained in the bill. It requires the FAA to recruit experienced controllers, including military and Department of Defense civilian controllers, Federal Contract Tower controllers, and those with prior FAA experience. It provides a path for CTI graduates and military veterans without subjecting them to the FAA's biographical assessment, and separately it provides for a general public recruiting pool. The FAA would be required to refer similar numbers of candidates from the CTI and veteran pool and the general public pool, while CTI graduates and veterans could also apply via the general public pool.

There is also very positive language in the bill regarding aircraft certification and involvement of our aviation safety engineers in that process.

On the other side of the ledger, there are a number of provisions within the bill that concern us. For example, there is a reactionary package of airport security measures following the terror attacks in Brussels last month that targeted the city's airport and subway system. The Senate bill would create additional restrictions on our members who are required to pass through airport security daily to access their facility.

Additionally, there is language that would essentially endorse the FAA's staffing plan, as well as a pilots' bill of rights provision that could create a chilling effect on submitting ATSAP reports. That language says that in the event a pilot is facing action against their flying certificate, they would have access to FAA flight records such as controller statements including those submitted under ATSAP.

The bill also contains the FAA's requested technical correction (editorial change) to FAA's ATC retirement provisions in order to continue its annuity computation for supervisors and second level managers. This correction would clear up a disagreement between the FAA and OPM regarding supervisor annuities. The Senate Commerce Committee and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) do not consider this a statutory change, only a clarification of the existing statutory language with no additional cost to the taxpayer. With that said, we are considering our options on how to proceed with this section when the bill is transferred to the House of Representatives. If we pursue an expansion of the existing retirement language that has any effect on the Federal budget, even nominally, it will be a heavy lift and very difficult to achieve success.

However, much could change on some of these issues before all is said and done. The Senate has an agreed-upon amendment package that may also be voted upon late this afternoon. Passage of this amendment package will require some procedural maneuvering. That package contains a provision that would strike the language we oppose regarding the FAA's staffing plan and add positive language to the provisions on organization designation authorizations. It would also modify the provisions regarding FAA hiring, but not in a negative way.

Regardless of whether the Senate bill passes with or without the amendment package, we will have work to do in the House when it takes up FAA Reauthorization again.

In Solidarity,

Paul Rinaldi - NATCA President
Trish Gilbert - NATCA EVP
 
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atcnewbie

Newcomer
Apr 21, 2016
11
0
1
Pensacola Florida
I thought to be hired you need a bachelors or 4 years work experience or a combination of the two if neither of those apply you need to go to cti to be considered right?
 

altonb2

Senior Member
Jan 23, 2014
253
0
16
Pensacola, Fl
nope, if neither of those apply and you have no post certification experience, you dont qualify. You can have a combination of work experience and schooling though.
 

NovemberEcho

Epic Member
Dec 8, 2010
4,388
68
48
Long Island
I thought to be hired you need a bachelors or 4 years work experience or a combination of the two if neither of those apply you need to go to cti to be considered right?
most CTI schools offer a 4 year program with a bachelors degree. A few offer 2 year CTI programs with an associates. I don't know if the 2 year ones qualify without having to add on work experience. All CTI programs end in a degree of some sort. However, until the FAA begins prioritizing CTI hires again, your best bet is to either enlist in the military for ATC, or go to college and get s bachelors in something other than ATC in case ATC doesn't work out for whatever reason.

my personal recommendation is to enlist. Rather than shelling out thousands of dollars and/or going into debt, you will be paid to train. You will gain real experience talking to real planes rather than working on sims that just help you to (maybe) pass the academy without teaching you actual ATC. I recommend either Air Force or Navy. The AF is the only one that can guarantee you either a radar approach ticket or control tower operators certificate (CTO) assuming you don't wash out. Additionally you gain Vet preference during hiring, you gain 1% to your retirement for each year you were in the military (if you buy back your military time after getting in the FAA), you can go to college for pretty much free while still in the military, after the military you can use the GI Bill for either housing subsidy while training with the FAA or school.
 
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atcnewbie

Newcomer
Apr 21, 2016
11
0
1
Pensacola Florida
So if you do a two year cti program you still wont be hired you have to have a four year degree even if it has nothing to do with atc that doesnt even make sense a two year cti program would prepare you more then a four year degree in something completely unrelated
 

altonb2

Senior Member
Jan 23, 2014
253
0
16
Pensacola, Fl
Thats what the current requirments are if you are dead set on doing a CTI degree make it a 4 year degree. But keep in mind as od now you will get no prefernece in hiring over someone who has worked fulltime for 4 years at the local mcdonalds...
 

NovemberEcho

Epic Member
Dec 8, 2010
4,388
68
48
Long Island
So if you do a two year cti program you still wont be hired you have to have a four year degree even if it has nothing to do with atc that doesnt even make sense a two year cti program would prepare you more then a four year degree in something completely unrelated
Don't worry, a 4 year degree in ATC doesn't prepare you for anything either. Everything covered in CTI school, whether 2 or 4 years, is covered in a couple months at the Academy and then you really learn ATC during OJT at your facility.
 

KeelowJay90

Junior Member
Dec 4, 2014
118
0
16
'Merica
As for military, I can vouche for you NE. Military experience is a huge plus, but if you want relevant air traffic experience, join the air force or navy. I did 5 years active duty with one deployment and honorable discharge for the GI Bill benefits, got out Oct 2015 with four air traffic ratings of which aren't relevant to the FAA at all because in the FAA, don't drive a truck out in the middle of a mud pit and start yelling at helicopters through a set of HF, VHF/UHF and SATCOM radios.