Prior service E-5 going to Rucker

sandboxpirate

Newcomer
Jul 14, 2013
2
0
1
NC
So here is the deal I have read a lot of the posts already about Army 15q training and so forth but have some specific questions. Here is my situation, I am a 28 yr. old E-5 in the Army Natl. Guard. Been an 11B since I joined in 06. I have always been interested in aviation and had an opportunity to transfer into a E-6 15Q slot in our Brigade HHC BAE cell. So I took the slot and have been at the unit for about 8 months, did a warfighter exercise and saw what a BAE does and realized I won't be doing much in that position. So one of the WO in our cell is the state aviation recruiter, we talk and he is like why not drop a Warrant packet. So I am, however the unit is wanting me to leave for 15q training as soon as I can. Here is my dilemma from what I have read so far a 15Q in the Army isn't going to do much, let alone one that is in the HHC of a Armor Brigade. I really want this warrant packet to work out but also understand the reality of not getting selected. I feel like even using the 15Q as a back up is a waste of 16 weeks or more at Rucker for a skill I won't use in my unit because we won't control anything unless we deploy, even then the chance is slim. NC guard does have an AOB and other aviation assets so I guess if warrant doesn't work and I get the 15q I could transfer to a aviation unit but still don't know if I will use it then. Just really questioning my choice of this assignment now that I am in it. But I don't want to go back to ground pounding and riding in Bradley's. Should I look into 15P slots to stay in the aviation side or just stick it out where I am at and see how the warrant boards go the next few years, as of right now max age is 33 so even if I non-select the first two times I still have some time left. Just looking some advice from those who understand Army aviation more than me. Thanks in advance.
 

nhstadt

Epic Member
Mar 24, 2011
2,980
57
48
south "Murica
You are correct, a 15Q in a HHC slot in an armor unit isn't doing jack but acting as a liaison between armor and air assets normally. If you deploy you'll end up doing alot of A2C2 I'd imagine, which is not working traffic in the least bit. Do you plan on trying to go ATC on the civilian side? if so, the slot your in severely limits your chances of getting the proper quals the FAA is looking for, still possible to get the job, but substantially tougher, especially considering your age and the way the FAA does their hiring. it takes forever, just read a few of these threads on this website. 15P isn't a very sexy job, but the training is alot shorter.
 

atcchief

Newcomer
Feb 14, 2014
3
0
1
You are correct, a 15Q in a HHC slot in an armor unit isn't doing jack but acting as a liaison between armor and air assets normally. If you deploy you'll end up doing alot of A2C2 I'd imagine, which is not working traffic in the least bit. Do you plan on trying to go ATC on the civilian side? if so, the slot your in severely limits your chances of getting the proper quals the FAA is looking for, still possible to get the job, but substantially tougher, especially considering your age and the way the FAA does their hiring. it takes forever, just read a few of these threads on this website. 15P isn't a very sexy job, but the training is alot shorter.
It's not all bad being Army ATC, I have been doing ATC for 16.5 years in the Army with 6 CTO Ratings to show for it. I spent the last couple of years being the Facility Chief (Army term) Chief Controller (AF Term) at Cairns ATCT. It was a great rating to have my facility had 252,000 movements last year which may not sound like a lot to some, but the kicker was most of that traffic came in a 4 hour period of the day 5 days a week (Closed weekends and holidays). The tower had the busiest approach control in the military feeding it traffic as well as a high density of VFR helicopters, with BE-20, Cessna, C560's the occasional G5/G4 thrown in with every kind of helo frame you can imagine. Intersecting runways with 10 helo pads and everything was active all the time as long as wind was in tolerance. Only place I know where you can land someone to Rwy 36 short of runway 6, while landing another helo to the numbers on rwy 18 while between the two have a missed approach fixed wing shoot right in front of them over Rwy 6. So it was a great place to learn mixing of different airspeeds definitely taught us how to think outside the box. Peak traffic was somewhere around 120-150 aircraft an hour. Sorry if that’s long and you didn’t enjoy the read. I am just probably one of the few Army controllers at this point in their career that is actually still passionate about the ATC portion of our job.
 

FoggyWindow

Trusted Contributor
Feb 18, 2011
684
16
18
Los Santos Intl Airport
It's not all bad being Army ATC, I have been doing ATC for 16.5 years in the Army with 6 CTO Ratings to show for it. I spent the last couple of years being the Facility Chief (Army term) Chief Controller (AF Term) at Cairns ATCT. It was a great rating to have my facility had 252,000 movements last year which may not sound like a lot to some, but the kicker was most of that traffic came in a 4 hour period of the day 5 days a week (Closed weekends and holidays). The tower had the busiest approach control in the military feeding it traffic as well as a high density of VFR helicopters, with BE-20, Cessna, C560's the occasional G5/G4 thrown in with every kind of helo frame you can imagine. Intersecting runways with 10 helo pads and everything was active all the time as long as wind was in tolerance. Only place I know where you can land someone to Rwy 36 short of runway 6, while landing another helo to the numbers on rwy 18 while between the two have a missed approach fixed wing shoot right in front of them over Rwy 6. So it was a great place to learn mixing of different airspeeds definitely taught us how to think outside the box. Peak traffic was somewhere around 120-150 aircraft an hour. Sorry if that’s long and you didn’t enjoy the read. I am just probably one of the few Army controllers at this point in their career that is actually still passionate about the ATC portion of our job.
I miss my Army ATC days.