Rose wants to learn about maintenance!

luna75

I am THE Pocket Ninja
Jun 18, 2008
1,510
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farmingdale ny
learn me something about being a maintenance tech....what do you have to learn, what are the requirements etc....planes dont fly without you guys keeping them in order and atc would have no planes to manage either....
 

randt

Junior Member
Jan 12, 2009
114
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There are several ways to become an aircraft mechanic.

1. If you have zero experience, you can still obtain a job as an aircraft mechanic. Basically, you would learn on the job skills, but could only work on the airplane under supervision of a licensed A&P mechanic. A&P stands for Airframe and Power Plant.

Under this scenario, after a certain amount of time working as a mechanic (I believe it is close to 3 years for A&P and maybe less than 2 for either A or P, but I don't have my FARs in front of me, so I don't know the exact number of months.) you may take the FAA test to receive your A&P or A or P (without school), if you are given a "recommendation" from your employer. (I believe an FAA official who has seen your work may also recommend you, but I won't swear to it.)

Obviously, the rules of life apply. If you have the certificate, you will make more money and it will be easier for you to find a job.

2. Attend one of many nationwide FAA part 147 Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools for training. Training is approximately 12 months for A or P and 24 months for A&P. After the schooling, you will need to take the FAA exams.

3. Lastly, Military training counts as FAA approved training, as long as you are in an acceptable Military Specialty. Lists of approved specialities are available at your local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).
 

luna75

I am THE Pocket Ninja
Jun 18, 2008
1,510
4
38
39
farmingdale ny
whats the difference between airframe and powerplant? im going to guess the the 1st has to do with the actual structure of the plane and the 2nd with the electronics and power supply to the engines?
 

randt

Junior Member
Jan 12, 2009
114
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18
Powerplant is to work on engines only, and airframe refers to every other part of the aircraft.
 

randt

Junior Member
Jan 12, 2009
114
1
18
There are one or two things neither an A or P (or an A&P) can do.

One is instrument repair. This requires a Radio Repair License. I am really grey in this area, so I will have to ask to get an answer you can count on, but A&Ps can do limited instrument work, but what that includes, I can't for sure specify.

The second is propellar work. A Powerplant (and A&Ps) can also do very limited work on propellers, but most prop maintenance has to be done at a specialty shop that holds the correct license. (Which I will also have to find out the correct name for.)
 

borkofae

Newcomer
Jun 13, 2009
23
0
1
learn me something about being a maintenance tech....what do you have to learn, what are the requirements etc....planes dont fly without you guys keeping them in order and atc would have no planes to manage either....
Well I did it in the military and getting my Airframe and Powerplant license was a joke when I got out. It?s not that hard of a job?Everything comes with manuals that you use to fix airplanes. It is def a rough lifestyle in the civilian side. You have to buy all ur own tools and start from the bottom. Most of the work is on night shift so don?t count of ever having a normal schedule. Maintenance dudes are the first ones laid off in any airline. I don?t like the lifestyle and really didn?t care for working on planes so I don?t do it anymore. I think flying them or controlling them is 100 times better.
 

atp2atc

Senior Member
Feb 2, 2009
172
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Boston, MA
I was thinking about possibly trying to become a mechanic so I could do work on my own plane when/if I get one or possibly doing side work for a little extra money. Anyone on here a mechanic and if so is this a good idea? Also is it going to be worth it/ be possible training while working a full time job?