Stand By?

bob44zw

Junior Member
Apr 5, 2011
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I know I asked this before, but I cannot find it. I know what it says in the .65:

STAND BY− Means the controller or pilot must pause for a few seconds, usually to attend to other duties of a higher priority. Also means to wait as in “stand by for clearance.” The caller should reestablish contact if a delay is lengthy. “Stand by” is not an approval or denial.

But we are getting a lot of readbacks that sound like this:

Tower : " King Air 2345, number three for departure, standby"
King Air: "King Air 2345, stand by, hold short of 28 right, number three, wilco."

I teach not saying a word if a controller says "standby" - but my fellow instructors do not want to make a big deal out of criticizing lengthy readbacks, since that is telling other instructors how to instruct.

Granted, my airline insisted on verbatim readbacks of everything (we used our noggin to shorten most of them), but with all the Asian students learning English on the tower frequency, I think we need to teach brevity, starting with not answering "standby".

Any input from those of you who make a living listening to pilot readbacks?
 

UNDgrad06

Epic Member
Dec 8, 2010
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Peachtree City, GA
If I say standby and they came back with some read back then I would be pissed. 99.9% standby is used by me, it means I have multiple things that need to happen before I think about what I need to do with the aircraft checking in.
 

ajmezz

Epic Member
Apr 8, 2010
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You're teaching them correctly. When I say standby, I don't want any sort of acknowledgement because it just eats up the frequency when I've got something more important to get done. Unfortunately, the Chinese students I deal with on a daily basis don't understand that and will come back with roger, standing by or something else, which defeats the purpose of standby and can be irritating.
 

phillyman2633

Epic Member
May 13, 2010
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International waters
www.drudgereport.com
But we are getting a lot of readbacks that sound like this:

Tower : " King Air 2345, number three for departure, standby"
King Air: "King Air 2345, stand by, hold short of 28 right, number three, wilco."
In the mother of all that is f*cking holy, please, teach everyone you can to never, ever do this. Ever. It's assumed that you're holding short of the runway. Nobody gave you a clearance to enter the runway. If I tell you to hold short of the runway, then yes, by all means, give me a full readback. But if I say standby, it's probably cuz I'm busy as shit and if I hear this, I am literally cursing you quite loudly in the tower cab off frequency, I guarangoddamtee you lol.
 

StuSEL

Moderator
Aug 23, 2009
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You know where.
There's no reason for a King Air to call "ready in sequence." Turbines are assumed to be ready when they reach the departure end of the runway, and this is an unnecessary transmission. At most airports, it's usually inappropriate for pistons to call "ready in sequence," too. It's usually only appropriate to call ready when you're #1 at the runway unless some local procedure dictates otherwise.
 

Stinger

Epic Member
May 24, 2009
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I don't mind a quick "roger" in response to a stand-by instruction.
Yes, turbines are supposed to be ready upon reaching the end of the runway, but it seems like about 40% they're not ready. I've kinda stopped assuming they're ready, and will ask them if they're ready to go when they haven't checked on yet.
 

phillyman2633

Epic Member
May 13, 2010
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There's no reason for a King Air to call "ready in sequence." Turbines are assumed to be ready when they reach the departure end of the runway, and this is an unnecessary transmission. At most airports, it's usually inappropriate for pistons to call "ready in sequence," too. It's usually only appropriate to call ready when you're #1 at the runway unless some local procedure dictates otherwise.
Ya. I have your strip, I know who you are. If you're holding short of a 10400' runway, especially not where flight training takes place, I'll likely clear you for takeoff before you call up. Not that I care if you're doing a run-up at the end (unless you're plugging shit up), but most of the local guys do their run-ups in the non-movement area before they taxi, or will specifically request a run-up area.

Not that this is the point of the thread. If I tell someone to standby, I expect: 1.) A double-click 2.) A quick "Roger" or 3.) Silence, because you're not the only person on freq
 

bob44zw

Junior Member
Apr 5, 2011
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No. I have extensive turboprop and jet experience, although I am a lowly Cub pilot. At air carrier airports a turbine is assumed ready - you never, ever call ready at LAX or Midway.

However, at small GA airports, some pilots are being taught to not switch to tower frequency until runup is complete. I teach to switch as soon as you pass the last turn around point, and do runups on tower frequency. Still, if there are three airplanes waiting, " in sequence" seems polite.

Our turbines are about half ready. If they are going out IFR, they must call for release. The polite ones will not block the preceding piston aircraft, although the turbine will generally get a release first. VFR is supposed to be first to call, not first to get to the threshold, and an IFR anything should respect that and not block the runway.

Different rules for different airports. But thank you for backing me up on this!
 

j_time41

Senior Analyst
Nov 17, 2008
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Lakeville, MN
Omg. Call if you are ready. If I say standby, say nothing or roger. Please don't say what you said in your first post or I may try to slowly knaw my own arm off while wearing a mouthguard just so I have something to throw at you.