The Benefits of Non-RADAR Training

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K-C 1962-67

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Nov 23, 2013
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RADARs break. Paper rarely breaks. Smart controllers always have a backup pencil & plan "What if ...".

Non-RADAR control all of the time? LOL! 6 aeroplanes an hour is OK? Yeah, right!

The ATP 7110 said "Be prepared for the unknown." I said "CYOA ALL THE TIME!" Radar breaks, pencils break, hell, even paper breaks! Be ready to do "Whatcha gotta do" to get them down ALIVE, with boredom as their companion.
 

K-C 1962-67

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Non Radar is taught because outside of the [vfr] tower it is the foundation of separating aircraft. Long before there was radar, there was non radar separation. Radar was implemented in the en route environment after two planes collided. Why did they collide at the same altitude, because pilot decided to lie about his reported altitude to show people the Grand Canyon. Radar was first used at busy terminal facilities.
Non radar also teaches you the fundamentals of coordination with other controllers.
Once again, non radar is the foundation of active separation.

VFR/OTP was not that cause? The same with that pair down in NJ in the ??? 60s?
 

K-C 1962-67

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... ... ... Radar was first used at busy terminal facilities. ... ... ...
Air Traffic Control (as opposed to air DEFENSE) RADAR was used in WWII England to guide landing aircraft safely, amongst other control/defensive uses. Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) was used to guide landing aircraft to a safe point where the pilot could see to land. Yes, in some unsual circumstances, the aircraft was guided down to touch-down. The early USAAF GCA units were the AN/MPN-1. Google for more info/photos.
 

lowapproach

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Oct 29, 2010
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If I were you, I would define what you think "non-radar training" is, and go from there.

Every time you clear an airplane into an airport where you don't have at least primary radar targets all the way down to the runway, you use rules from Chapter 4. Every time you release an airplane out of an airport, you use rules from Chapter 4 to separate them from your other traffic until you can identify the airplane and begin using rules from Chapter 5. You use the principles and phraseology of non-radar control all the time in a radar environment (i.e., clearing an aircraft to climb to an intermediate altitude that is below the altitude of head-on traffic until you have X miles between them, clearing an aircraft to cross a fix at an altitude by LOA as the aircraft enters another facility's airspace).

Does that mean that using only flight progress strips for two weeks in a pass-pass environment is the best way to teach these rules? Maybe not, but it's the FAA and we hate changing anything until somebody makes us.
 
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charliezuluatc

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The crossing restriction is probably the single greatest contribution of non radar.
 

pwewe

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May 8, 2011
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As another student from UND, probably in your non-radar class with you this semester (based off your post date and have MN in your name). Just go to the resource center, interview one atc prof or assistant, and be done with it. I don't think stuck mic is gonna be too useful in this assignment.....
 

MikeATC

Retired FAA, NATCA Member
Apr 3, 2009
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There is no real benefit for Non-Radar over Radar. I just finished a contract in Africa where everything was non-radar approach and area control, and I will say emphatically that having Radar would had made the job way easier let alone much more efficient.
 

ATCtower

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Oct 26, 2008
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Im going out on a limb here and saying that no one here has worked enroute traffic (maybe Mike since I know hes been around a while).

Sure, NR is a pain in the ass at times, but I can assure you, it has its uses. Using NR in the enroute environment allows you to release departures much more quickly when radar coverage is lousy.

New rules in NR separation allow you to separate from the centerline of known traffic instead of the silly 17/20mi rules.

NR rules is the only way you can legally run timed approaches.

The list goes on and on but you have to know it and work it on a daily basis to understand the importance. While it can totally be a pain in the ass, it also has its benefits, especially when you own airspace where you cant see planes until they are 11k'+...
 
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