Way Points

kapadiamaulik

Newcomer
Sep 20, 2008
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0
1
Hi,

I am a student and pursuing my Masters field. Frankly speaking I have no experience in Air Traffic. I am doing a research project on how the ATC works and stuff. For all those have experience I needed to ask a couple of things.

1. I needed to know, how does the pilot maintain the air route for the required destination ? What i know is there are few way points through which under normal conditions a air craft has to pass. So what are these way points ?? Is it necessarily have to be some air ports ? or that can be just some towers ??

I hope you people can help me out so that I can understand the current concepts.

Regards,
 

Roddy_Piper

Resident Knucklehead
Jun 15, 2008
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Vegas baby
www.myspace.com
Fixes are not towers and not necessarily airports. They are NAVAIDS (most times located at airports), named intersections of NAVAID radials, distance and radial from a NAVAID (fix, radial, distance OR dme fixes), GPS fixes (received by GPS), or just latitude/longitude fixes. There's a few new types of fixes showing up in the en route maps. They look something like this...KD543. Their depicted mostly in conjunction with lat/longs. I don't really like them from the en route controller point of view because there's 0% chance of knowing where that fix is in the world. (most of the geeks know exactly where they all are..tee hee).

Anyway, these days the pilots navigate by letting their auto pilot point the way. They fly to the point that they requested in their flight plan. Their flight plan consists of fixes or routes as stated above. The airplane then flies to the points they requested.

That's pretty basic. Not sure my terminology helps you any. I guess I sometimes assume everyone will know what I mean by NAVAID, fix, radial, etc. Let me know if I need to further explain it. Or you could search for a "IFR enroute high altitude" or "IFR enroute low altitude" chart for a picture of what I'm talking about. looks something like this. this one includes southern california to Phoenix.
 

Dale

Senior Member
Jun 19, 2008
216
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Uniondale, Indiana
The FAA has facilities called Very High Frequency Omni-Direction and Ranging (VOR) to provide radials from a given facility location and distance from that same facility. Fixes are where radials from adjacent facilities, VOR's, intersect.

The military also used Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) for a bit more sophisticated information. The TACAN's are usually co-located with VOR's.
 

kapadiamaulik

Newcomer
Sep 20, 2008
2
0
1
Hey guys, I guess that information will be helping enough.

I am doing my masters degree Mechanical Engineering, and my research is based on the Next Gen Navigation Systems.

I'll let you know if I need any more info, but i guess its sufficient for now.

Thanks
 
A

Adam

Guest
When you are done with your paper...or if you have any other papers on any aviation related matters, post them in the article section....you can post them under your real name or username and then you will get credit for all the publications on this site!